Inshore Rescue Boat

Inshore rescue boats (IRBs) are primarily used by lifeguards so that they can reach casualties in the surf, fast.

This small inflatable boat tends to be operated by two people: one focused on controlling the craft, the other focused on finding and aiding casualties.

Racing

IRB Start

As well as using these boats for their main purpose – saving lives – we also compete against other lifesaving clubs across the country.

Powered by their 30hp outboard, these little 3.88m boats can power through surf at a top speed of 26 knots, manoeuvering easily between buoys and other obsticals, making IRB racing one of the most exciting sports around.

In 2017, the IRB Team joined 13 other clubs in Carbis Bay for an IRB race training day.

IRB race training in Carbis Bay

Rescue Tube

The IRB leaves the beach and proceeds to a designated buoy where the crew dives into the water with a rescue tube and swims to a patient before towing them back to the awaiting IRB. The IRB then returns to shore where the driver leaves the boat and sprints to the finish line.

Single Rescue

The IRB leaves the beach and proceeds to a designated buoy, picking up a patient, and returning to shore where the driver leaves the boat and sprints to the finish line.

Mass Rescue

This is a similar event to the Single Rescue, but when crossing the finish line the driver returns to the IRB and makes a second pick up before returning to the finish line.

Team Rescue

This is a similar event to the Mass Rescue, but when crossing the finish line the driver tags a second driver and crew who then returns to the IRB and makes a second pick up before returning to the finish line.

Safety & Patrolling

As well as racing, a major part of IRB is weekend patrolling, and providing safety cover for events around Bournemouth.

The IRB Team can be seen providing safety cover for the Bournemouth Air Festival, Brownsea Island Swim, and numerous triathlons throughout the year.